THE SEASONS OF THE BRIDGE

GOAT ISLAND LIGHT
GOAT ISLAND LIGHT

 

THE FERRY AND THE BRIDGE
THE FERRY AND THE BRIDGE

SUN OVER THE BRIDGESUN OVER THE BRIDGE

FOG UNDER THE BRIDGE
FOG UNDER THE BRIDGE
FOG IN THE CHANNEL
FOG IN THE CHANNEL
BEFORE DAWN
BEFORE DAWN
SUNSET
SUNSET
ARCTIC MIST
ARCTIC MIST
ROSE ISLAND AND THE NEWPORT BRIDGE
ROSE ISLAND AND THE NEWPORT BRIDGE

ferry083

FERRIES IN JAMESTOWN
FERRIES IN JAMESTOWN
EARLY STAGES
EARLY STAGES

The Newport Bridge which opened in the summer of 1969 and changed forever the personalities of the towns of Jamestown and  Newport.

In as much that one can now drive to or from newport at any time one wishes. It changed the pedestrian life forever. In the days of the ferry, one could walk on the ferry in Jamestown and walk off in downtown Newport. A peaceful and quiet integration that is forever lost.

The photograph of the ferry with the bridge in the background; I took leaving Newport on the yacht “Carina” for the start of the 1969 trans-atlantic race to Ireland. I returned to the bridge being open, the ferry gone and Woodstock having changed the world.

RIGHTING A WRONG

 

 

NEWPORT, R.I.—A barge that sank in Rhode Island’s Narragansett Bay after the October snowstorm is back on the surface.

 

The U.S. Coast Guard says efforts are now under way to remove 3,900 gallons of diesel fuel that were on the barge when it sank Oct. 31 following the Nor’easter.

 

The 120-by-30-foot barge flipped upside down when it sank in more than 100 feet of water. Crews decided to right the vessel and bring it into shallower water before removing the fuel.

 

The barge was operated by a contractor hired to paint the Pell Bridge, which connects Newport to Jamestown.

 

The Coast Guard is working with a salvage company to raise the barge. Officials say the operation could end this week depending on the weather.

HISTORICAL CONTEXT, the way we were

It is important to keep a perspective. This is the Newport during the 1960’s.Newport was still as sleepy navy town. We do not often take the time to reflect on how things were. If you are like me; you are racing to finish what you started during the day. Never mind the simple interruptions.
    The Newport Bridge did not open until 1969. The photograph of the ferry with the bridge in the background I took from the transom of “Carina” on the way out to the start of the transatlantic race to Ireland.
    These are the men who worked on the 12 meters and every other ship that was hauled at Newport Shipyard.
     Newport still had a working waterfront, filled with fishing boats. As you look at the photos many more small insights will appear.