• RAINY DAY PHOTOS

    Weather has a profound effect on everything we do. the way we dress, what we decide to do in a day. Where is decide to do it. How we decide to do it. Whether we like it or not weather is a primary concern.

    Walking in Paris today in the rain changed everything. I was more protective of my camera, which in turn changed the way I took photographs; or if I would even choose to take one.

    GOSSIP ON THE BUS
    GOSSIP ON THE BUS
    SNAKES
    SNAKES
    DRAGONS
    DRAGONS

    paris 12 11 14  47955 - Version 2

    SAINT AUGUSTIN IN THE RAIN
    SAINT AUGUSTIN IN THE RAIN
    RUSSIAN CHURCH
    RUSSIAN CHURCH
    WALKING IN THE RAIN
    WALKING IN THE RAIN
    BUSY AT THE BUS STOP
    BUSY AT THE BUS STOP


  • THE MORE I LEARN THE LESS I KNOW

     

    We are all guilty at some level of considering ourselves and our culture the best there is. It is a refreshing wakeup call to see things so refined created centuries before the bronze age in Europe. Musee Guimetmusee guimet 12 17 14  49853musee guimet 12 17 14  49803musee guimet 12 17 14  49816musee guimet 12 17 14  49953musee guimet 12 17 14  49945musee guimet 12 17 14  49913musee guimet 12 17 14  49830musee guimet 12 17 14  49893



  • SAVING SAILING?

    The discussion about saving sailing is not a new one. I am one of those people who believe that youth sailing is out of whack. The costs associated are silly. Yet if you want your child to be competitive; you must buy in to the game.
    The above video about building the patapon may be more than some wish to commit to in terms of detail of finish, but the concept is what is really important.
    The Opti for example was originally conceived to be built inexpensively in your garage in plywood.

    Don Finkle presents a compelling argument in his scuttlebutt article.

    Where have all the young ones gone?
    by Don Finkle, RCR Yachts
    We have always believed in and supported youth sailing, which has now expanded from junior sailing schools to high school to college. The latter programs continue to pop up everywhere and young people can now start out at 6 years old and sail extensively on teams up into their early twenties. They have terrific opportunities that we never had at that age.

    We are cranking out more well trained sailors than ever before. At the same time we hear that not enough young people are sailing and racing once they graduate out of these programs. We have more skilled young sailors but they are not sticking with it. Why doesn’t this add up?

    I don’t buy the idea that kids (I use that term loosely) stop sailing because boats are no longer given to them to use. There are so many crew shortages, even boats they can borrow, that opportunities to sail are everywhere. Used boats are very inexpensive right now; being in the business I can say that with confidence. Many small used one design boats are practically being given away. In our opinion the problem lies elsewhere.

    If a youngster starts sailing at six years old and stays with it through college, he/she will have been sailing for most of their lives to that point. Frankly, for them to opt out at this point, it is often a case of “been there, done that”. Those hours and days spent sailing in dinghies were hours they were not playing golf, tennis, softball, fishing, scuba diving, swimming, biking, and many other activities they now want to try.

    Young people today have so many opportunities and are accustomed to doing many different things for entertainment. Sailing gets crossed off the list and they are ready to catch up on what they missed. The other issue is that if sailing as they know it means more short-course races in small boats many of them have had their fill after 10-15 years of doing it. Some are just plain burned out.

    A percentage of these skilled and enthusiastic dinghy sailors will stay with it. Others will come back to the sport when they are older, often much older. But if we want to keep more young sailors engaged in the sport in their 20s and 30s, they need to see more of a return on their time in the form of fun and social interaction. This likely means a different type of sailing than what they have been doing.

    We should ask them and find out.



  • NOTRE DAME, ABOVE PARIS

     

    The weather cleared for a time, so I thought I would risk waiting in line and climbing (386 steps up and then down) the tower of Notre Dame. Fortune smiled on me and the day cleared even more and I was able to see for the first time the view and the fantasy of  the stone carvers of Notre Dame.  It is not a stretch get from these gargoyles to fairy tales. And what must have gone through the minds of the men carving these beasts. What a treat.

     

    ABOVE PARIS
    ABOVE PARIS
    LOOKING DOWN
    LOOKING DOWN

    notre dame 12 16 14  49728 - Version 2notre dame 12 16 14  49333 - Version 2notre dame 12 16 14  49730 - Version 2notre dame 12 16 14  49357 - Version 2notre dame 12 16 14  49359 - Version 2notre dame 12 16 14  49250 - Version 2notre dame 12 16 14  49334 - Version 2notre dame 12 16 14  49352 - Version 2notre dame 12 16 14  49345 - Version 2

    RABBIT MEAL
    RABBIT MEAL

    notre dame 12 16 14  49326 - Version 2

    DAYDREAMING
    DAYDREAMING
    ENJOYING THE VIEW
    ENJOYING THE VIEW


  • DEVILS AND ANGELS

    The remarkable exhibit of Marcel Duchamp at the Centre Pompidou was another thought provoking event. The models of Frank Gehry’s work resemble what my 3-4 year old grandchildren might create. There is no denying the finished product,but what courage the client exhibited by deciding to go forward based on what they were shown.

    The day ended with a treat to the boys choir of St. Eustache singing christmas carols. Just as remarkable are the acoustics of the church of that size; not swallowing those delicate voices.

    BOYS CHOIR AT ST. EUSTACHE
    BOYS CHOIR AT ST. EUSTACHE
    CHRISTMAS CAROLS
    CHRISTMAS CAROLS
    CHOIR
    CHOIR
    ST. EUSTACHE
    ST. EUSTACHE
    ST. EUSTACHE
    ST. EUSTACHE

    st. eustache 12 14 14  49105

    GARGOYLE
    GARGOYLE

    st. merry 12 14 14  49050

    LOST SOUL
    LOST SOUL

    st. merry 12 14 14  49051

    CONDEMNED
    CONDEMNED


  • CRIME AND PUNISHMENT: DIRK DE RIDDER

    This is a story that I have followed with interest. I have always felt that the punishment handed out to Team Oracle during the America’s Cup was very strange.  A punishment handed out for something that occurred in a series that actually had nothing whatsoever to do with the America’s Cup event.

    I also have trouble believing that Dirk de Ridder could have approved changes to a boat without higher authority approval. I am pleased for Dirk de Ridder.

     

    Dirk De Ridder Suspension Reduced To 18 Months By The CAS
    Lausanne, Switzerland: The Dutch sailor and former member of Oracle Team USA, Dirk de Ridder, has had his three-year suspension reduced to 18 months by the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS). Mr de Ridder filed an appeal at the CAS in June 2014 against the decisions taken by the Disciplinary Commission (DC) of the International Sailing Federation (ISAF) and the ISAF Review Board in relation to the sailor’s alleged involvement in the manipulation of the weight distribution of AC45 yachts used in the inaugural America’s Cup World Series (ACWS) and the 2013 America’s Cup. The ISAF DC found that he had committed a gross breach of the rule which requires boats to comply with class rules, as well as of good sportsmanship, had brought the sport into disrepute and was therefore open to sanction. The ISAF Review board concurred and imposed a period of ineligibility of three years.

    In appealing to the CAS, Mr de Ridder sought to overturn such decisions on the grounds that they were based on insufficient evidence, that the imposed sanction was disproportionate and that the ISAF lacked jurisdiction.

    The CAS Panel found that the ISAF had jurisdiction to issue its decisions, and also found, to its comfortable satisfaction, that Mr de Ridder gave instructions, express or implied, to add weight to the forward king post of boat 4 at the Newport Regatta, part of the ACWS competition, held in June/July 2012. However, with respect to the sanction, the Panel found that a period of ineligibility of 3 years was disproportionate in light of the circumstances of the case and compared to previous sanctions imposed by the sailing federation in similar matters.